SMART Goals Examples for Improving Your Writing Skills

Having these baby steps set and planned out will help you stay on track and free you from the pressure of constantly wondering when you’ll have time to write.

SMART Goals Examples for Improving Your Writing Skills

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Good writing skills are becoming more critical, particularly in finding and maintaining a good job. As a writer, you are faced with several challenges. This has to do with your overall writing skills, not just with the profession in general.

A lack of vocabulary, issues with plagiarism, insufficient reasoning and cognitive skills, a lack of feedback, poor grammar and spelling, and a lack of research skills are problems you may face.

However, setting SMART goals is one thing that can help you significantly improve your writing skills. This article discusses SMART goals for writing skills.

Set Deadlines

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Even if you do not have any required writing deadlines, set them anyway. Deadlines motivate you to finish something—anything—and the challenge will push you to get something done instead of procrastinating.

As mentioned above, set a deadline for each day to write so many words. This smaller baby deadline will help you reach your greater deadline of writing a whole book… if that is your goal.

Use an Editorial Calendar or a Planner

By using a calendar or a planner, you can break your writing goals down into weekly and daily goals. Prioritize them per day as needed, and remember to keep your writing goals and deadlines SMART.

Objectives to support IEP Writing Goals

  1. Write the main idea with some supporting details on a topic.
  2. Research and write to convey understanding of a topic using at least one resource.
  3. Write clear, focused main ideas and supporting details on a topic.
  4. Write a multi-paragraph passage to develop a topic using details, examples, and illustrations.
  5. Revise writing for the development of the main idea with supporting details.
  6. Research using verifiable sources to develop and support the topic.
  7. Research and write to convey a thorough understanding of a topic using two or more resources.
  8. Include some relevant facts and details on a chosen topic.
  9. Convey clear, focused main ideas and supporting details on a topic for a variety of audiences and purposes.
  10. Include appropriate facts and details on a chosen topic.
  11. Use writing to generate a learning log and journals to record new information.
  12. Use writing to generate diagrams, learning logs, journals, note-taking, outlines, and summaries.
  13. Write the main idea with some supporting details on a topic.
  14. Research and write to convey understanding of a topic using at least one resource.
  15. Write clear, focused main ideas and supporting details on a topic.
  16. Write a multi-paragraph passage to develop a topic using details, examples, and illustrations.
  17. Revise writing for the development of the main idea with supporting details.
  18. Research using verifiable sources to develop and support the topic.
  19. Research and write to convey a thorough understanding of a topic using two or more resources.
  20. Include some relevant facts and details on a chosen topic.
  21. Convey clear, focused main ideas and supporting details on a topic for a variety of audiences and purposes.
  22. Include appropriate facts and details on a chosen topic.
  23. Use writing to generate a learning log and journals to record new information.
  24. Use writing to generate diagrams, learning logs, journals, note-taking, outlines, and summaries.
  25. Organize writing to address audience and purpose in chronological and logical sequences (e.g., sequence, place, importance).
  26. Write a sentence that connects related ideas that maintain a topic.
  27. Research using verifiable sources to develop and support a topic.
  28. Write stories with a beginning, middle, and end.
  29. Demonstrate organization by developing a beginning, middle, and ending using some transition words (e.g., first, next, then).
  30. Demonstrate organization by developing an introduction, body of text and conclusion with clear sequencing of ideas and use of transitional words and phrases.
  31. Select appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., outlining, identifying, and supporting topic, following a model, maps, and charts).
  32. Organize paragraphs when writing from a prompt or on a topic.
  33. Use paragraphs to organize structure within the text for a specific purpose of the content.
  34. Write paragraphs in which sentences are related to the topic.
  35. Write paragraphs containing a stated main idea and a closing sentence.
  36. Write multi-paragraph passages (e.g., stories, reports).
  37. Revise writing by adding or deleting text.
  38. Change some text to improve clarity.
  39. Revise writing to improve clarity and effectiveness by adding relevant details and changing or rearranging text.
  40. Edit writing to organize sentences into paragraphs.
  41. Edit writing to use transitional words and phrases to connect ideas in sentences and paragraphs (e.g., therefore, on the other hand).
  42. Revise writing so it has a sequence (e.g., beginning, middle, end).
  43. Revise writing so the paper has an order that makes sense, including details, ideas sentences, time sequence, and paragraphs.
  44. Classify words and topics into an organizational scheme.

Proven Ways to Achieve Your Writing Goals

1. Set your daily minimum writing target.

For example, you might think that it makes more sense to set a goal of at least 1,000 words a day, but then you hit a low point, you feel overwhelmed, and you barely have ten minutes to give to writing before you have to run out the door again or before you collapse into bed.

So, you think, “Well, it’s not even worth it” and skip writing for the day. And once you give yourself permission to skip one day, it gets easier to skip others.

2. Plan and schedule each writing project (book, blog post, article, etc.).

For instance, you might find it takes about a month to write a 25,000-word nonfiction book, another three weeks to revise it, and an additional week for a final edit.

woman typing on a laptop writing goals

Once you have an idea of roughly how long it’ll take to write a book and get it ready for publication, you can set your publication deadline on your calendar.

And once you have it on the calendar, you can tell others about it — including an accountability partner, who’ll check on your progress and help you stay on track.

Once you break down a larger project (a book, novel, screenplay, etc.) into smaller parts — and you have a fair understanding of how long it will take you to finish each part — you’ll be better able to schedule the entire project.

3. Set milestones for each larger project, and celebrate your progress.

4. Use time blocks for your daily writing commitment.

If you keep a record of these details, you’ll be able to review them later and see what details contributed to a higher word count and which ones slowed you down.

5. Make time for self-education.

When you read effective writing examples in your genre, you learn how to improve your writing, which increases the likelihood that your readers will not only finish your book but leave a positive review for it.

5th grade writing IEP goals

Use key details to determine the main idea IEP Goal

By (date), when given a list of 3 key detail sentences from a paragraph about the same topic, the student will choose the main idea that ties all the details together, improving reading strategies skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.

Put the sentences in order IEP Goal

By (date), when given a paragraph in sentence strip form, the student will put the sentences in order, improving writing strategies skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.

Organize information by main idea IEP Goal

By (date), when given a sample report topic and a list of topic detail sentences (graphic organizer with sentence strips), the student will organize information by main ideas (ie. a report on Europe, geography vs languages), improving writing strategies skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.

Choose the best topic sentence IEP Goal

By (date), when given a short paragraph (missing topic sentence) and 3 sample topic sentences, the student will choose the best topic sentence, improving writing strategies skills from 0/10 work samples out of ten consecutive trials to 8/10 work samples in ten consecutive trials.

Teacher Tip: When developing IEP goals for your children, don’t forget to take into account the value of a writing rubric for each writing assignment. It’s how all writing objectives can be assessed and tracked over time. Have the students create writing samples often and on many different subjects.

The list of IEP goals is not intended to be a comprehensive guide for all writing instruction, writing assignments, or in support of proper essay structure, but it will get you started in coming up with ideas for how to improve your teaching and meet the needs of your learners.

References:

https://www.developgoodhabits.com/smart-goals-writing-skills/
https://www.blogsuccessjournal.com/best-writing-goals/
https://adayinourshoes.com/7-measurable-iep-goals-for-writing-skills/
https://authority.pub/writing-goals/
https://www.theteacherdollarstore.com/post/15-measurable-iep-goals-and-objectives-for-writing-and-written-expression